Austrian Mathematician

Well-known American mathematician Michael Thoreau Lacey was born September 26, 1959. Lacey graduated with a Bachelor’s of Science degree at the University of Texas during the year of 1981.

Later, he would then move on to newer pastures and receive his Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1987, with Walter Philipp as the advisor. Professor Walter Philipp is a famous Austrian mathematician that studied probability theory and the theory of numbers. Learn more about Michael Lacey: http://people.math.gatech.edu/~lacey/ and https://www.math.gatech.edu/people/michael-lacey

Interested in problem solving and puzzles that mostly involved the law of iterated algorithm, Lacey’s first thesis would be on the Banach Spaces Probability. A Banach space is a complete normed vector space with a metric that allows computation of the vector length as well as its distance between vectors.

Walter Philipp was Lacey’s project supervisor during the time and guided him with the necessary information and knowledge so he could complete the thesis in the right manner.

Michael Lacey would secure his first postdoctoral position at the Louisiana State University as an assistant professor from 1987-1988. For just a year after that, Lacey transferred and became an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina. There he would predominantly lecture about probability, ergodic theory and harmonic analysis. Lacey also work alongside Walter Philipp at the University of North Carolina to proof the central limit theorem.

From 1989 to 1996, Michael Lacey moved to Bloomington, Indiana and was hired as an assistant professor at the Indiana University. While working there, he received a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship recognition. There he would also begin a study of the bilinear Hilbert transform. Read more: Michael Lacey | Mathalliance and Michael Lacey | Wikipedia

The transform was during that time a conjecture of Argentinian mathematician, Alberto Calderon. The Hilbert transform was later solved by Michael Lacey and Christoph Thiele in 1996; they each received the Prix Salem Prize award for their achievements.

Lacey transferred shortly after to the Georgia Institute of Technology as an assistant professor in 1996, he is now currently employed as a full professor (senior professor) at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. From time to time, he would serve as a visiting professor at the Helsinki University.

Lacey has received many awards throughout his career. In 2008 he was awarded the Georgia Tech NSF-ADVANCE Mentoring Award and the Fulbright Fellowship Award. Lacey was also honored with the Simons Fellow Award during the year of 2012. Michael’s most recent was the American Mathematical Society Fellow that was awarded in 2013.

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